DUTCH TREAT CATALOG

By HeartBy Heart — DTR 1006 (CD)

In recent years, Bill has moved more surely into a certain attractive and accessible landscape of the jazz camp that is neither frantic fusion, formulaic lite jazz nor harmonically impaired new age. The main reason why he has conquered those slippery slopes is his choice of empathetic instrumentalists in his ever-changing Rent’s Due Band. For “By Heart,” he put together a core of top musicians who are chums off the job but who pursue very different musical paths. For example, bassist Paul Langosch works in Tony Bennett’s band. Drummer David Mattacks is best known for his work with Fairport Convention, Richard Thompson, and Mary Chapin Carpenter, but is at heart a jazz drummer. Bruce Swaim, the remarkable tenor sax player who stamps this album with a lyrical authenticity, has worked with everybody from Keeter Betts, Ella Fitzgerald’s longtime bass player, to the late guitar hero Danny Gatton. Songs range from a opening-cut solo piano performance to a langorous rumba to a full-blazing hard-bop sextet number to a remarkable bolero playedjust by Holland and Langosch, overdubbed to create a bass choir. These instrumentals are seasoned with a couple of choice vocal tunes, some in the laid-back combo style with roots in Nat Cole and Mose Allison but updated most popularly by Diana Krall and Nora Jones. For this album, Bill was nominated for five Washington Area Music Awards; he walked away with the Best Jazz Duo or Group award. more ...

Way OverdueWay Overdue — The Best of Bill Holland & the Rent's Due Band — DTR 1005 (CD) (1998)

A completely remastered compilation of The Best of Bill Holland and the Rent's Due Band, 1974-1981. Sixteen tracks. Also features previously unreleased songs and studio and live performances. Hailed by The Washington Post as a "revelation" and "a motherlode of highlights and rarities." more ...

Players, Fools and ThievesPlayers, Fools and Thieves — DTR 1004 (CD) (1995)

Performing Songwriter Magazine rated this album which highlighted Bill's return to the scene, as one of five best indie albums of 1995. Also nominated by the Washington Area Music Assn. for Album of the Year and Songwriter of the Year, the album won Holland Best Jazz Vocalist award. DC Scene characterized the album as "a soundtrack to the story of your life." more ...

True Blue TrioTrue Blue Trio — DTR 1003 (Cassette) (1993)

Originally recorded in trio format as a cassette demo for clubs, the jazz-oriented True Blue Trio got leaked to the press. In its review, The Washington Post gave it thumbs up, calling it "soul jazz with sardonic wit and unabashed sentiment." The review spotlighted Holland's reading of "Pennies From Heaven" and Ellington's "I Ain't Got Nothin' But the Blues" as "among the album's highlights," adding that the Holland's singing "reflects the humor and, stoic philosophy advanced by the likes of Percy Mayfield and Mose Allison." more ...

Let It Go LiveLet It Go Live — DTR 1002 (LP) (1980)

Recorded from an FM aircheck of a headline performance at Washington's legendary Cellar Door, this album catches the last Rent's Due Band-- Paul Bell, guitar; Larry Strother, tenor sax; Ronnie Newmyer, bass, and Chuck Sullivan, drums, at their peak. Included are the killer-diller tunes that didn't make it onto album form, such as "Ernie's Place," "Crossing the Line" and "You, My Lover." more ...

It's About TimeIt's About Time — DTR 1001 (LP) (1979)

The Washington Post heralded this album as the work of "a first-rate composer and lyricist with an explosive band whose songs range from existential funk to tender ballads to joyous fusion." On guitar on this album are Rent's Due alumni John Jennings, best known for his later work with Mary Chapin Carpenter, and Keith Grimes, who was Eva Cassidy's guitarist throughout her short career. Featured are progressive station favorites, "Talk that Talk" and "Hamburger Heaven" with Jennings and "Feel That Fire" and "Run or Fight" with Grimes. more ...

If It Ain't One ThingIf It Ain't One Thing ... — Adelphi 4104 (LP) (1975)

Voted one of WHFS FM albums of the year, 1976. Included in Village Voice columnist Robert Christgau's book, "Rock Albums of the '70's." Says Christgau: "If I were an a&r man and heard some unknown put across songs as out-of-the-ordinary as 'This Fourth Year' and 'Do The Mambo,' I'd say to hell with the cracked voice and sign him." "B+" more ...